THE BLACK FRIDAY SALE IS HERE!    BUY 1 CLASS - GET 20% OFF, BUY 2 CLASSES - GET 32% OFF, BUY 3 OR 4 CLASSES - GET 36% OFF
AUTOMATICALLY APPLIED AT CHECKOUT

THE BLACK FRIDAY SALE IS HERE!
BUY 1 CLASS - GET 20% OFF
BUY 2 CLASSES - GET 32% OFF
BUY 3 OR 4 CLASSES - GET 36% OFF
AUTOMATICALLY APPLIED AT CHECKOUT

 

Find out the story behind these classic images and own a Joel Meyerowitz print for only $125

©Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Paris, France (1973)

$125

Can you imagine how fantastic this moment felt to me? There, on a bridge in Paris, a man and his monkey, and a mother and her baby cross paths, and only the monkey and the baby make contact, and then the colours! That they would both be in black and white! This is the kind of small event that makes for delightful looking again and again.

Signed on verso   •   4.5 x 6.6” image printed on 5 x 7” paper   •   Digital-C print on Fuji Crystal Archive paper

 

©Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

5th Avenue Lovers – New York City (1974)

$125

The woman in the gorgeous fur coat pressed up against the cold granite of Rockefeller Centre; the guy making his case for whatever it is he wants or needs, the businessmen and their cigars a­­nd fedoras, all of it became visible in one of those split second interactions in which – really – nothing much is happening – and yet…there was something in that moment that felt necessary to observe and make a photograph of.

Signed on verso   •   4.5 x 6.6” image printed on 5 x 7” paper   •   Digital-C print on Fuji Crystal Archive paper

 

 

©Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Florida (1964)

$125

Sometimes it’s just the light that turns a moment into something of more than passing interest. I was standing in the parking lot of the marina after scouting for a location when the sun peeked out of some low clouds and lit the scene in this dramatic way. Of course, the gestures of the woman in the bikini, and her friend, as well as the reach of the man’s arm in the car lent a dynamic charge to the scene, particularly his arm with its slight implication of menace. These subtle shadings of meaning are what moved me to shoot.

Signed on verso   •   4.5 x 6.6” image printed on 5 x 7” paper   •   Digital-C print on Fuji Crystal Archive paper

 

 

Own a unique Joel Meyerowitz portrait of a master photographer

©Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Henri Cartier-Bresson – New York City (1963)

$125

Tony Ray Jones and I spotted HCB after the St. Paddy’s day parade up on E.86 St. Tony suggested I go over and ask him if he is, in fact, Cartier-Bresson. We were two young, bearded guys, and I remember I was wearing a WW2 parka with a raggedy fur collar. When I finally asked him if he is HCB… he said, “Are you ze police?” I replied: “No, we’re just 2 young guys learning to shoot!” to which he said: “Yes, I am Cartier-Bresson. Meet me here when ze action quiets down and I’ll take you for coffee.” And we did! After that, whenever I saw him in NY and Paris, he was always just as friendly.

Signed on verso   •   4.5 x 6.6” image printed on 5 x 7” paper   •   Digital-C print on Fuji Crystal Archive paper

 

©Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Garry Winogrand – Paris, France (1967)

$125

Garry was my close friend and daily shooting buddy for many years. We began seeing each other in late 1962 and kept it going until he moved away from New York in the 70’s, In 1966-67 I lived in Europe for a year, and Garry, while on an ad job in Scotland, came over to Paris to see me and spend a week shooting and traveling together. This is Garry at 39 while I was 29. I love that behind him this tender street drama was playing out while his attention was toward me and whatever was happening behind me.

Signed on verso   •   4.5 x 6.6” image printed on 5 x 7” paper   •   Digital-C print on Fuji Crystal Archive paper

 

©Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

André Kertész – New York City (1980)

$125

My friend and long-time collaborator, Colin Westerbeck, and I were finishing our book, BYSTANDER, and would sometimes visit with André Kertész. On one visit, when we entered the apartment, we saw a fried egg on the entrance hall table – a visual joke of sorts. I picked it up and went onto the terrace to ask André about it. He grabbed it and slapped it on his head! I raised my camera and in a split second made this shot. Afterwards, Colin and I laughed because, from our point of view, it seemed a perfect description of Kertész. When you say of someone ‘they have egg on their face’ it’s often a sign of embarrassment, or of not being seen the way you want or believe you should be seen. He was always a public moaner, expressing his feeling that he didn’t get the attention he deserved; while in reality, he was celebrated everywhere! As soon as André put the egg on Colin and I saw that he made the phrase’ meaning visible.

Signed on verso   •   4.5 x 6.6” image printed on 5 x 7” paper   •   Digital-C print on Fuji Crystal Archive paper

 

All these photographs can be purchased as prints for a limited time only in Joel’s holiday print sale. Click below to visit the sale and buy your own Joel Meyerowitz print!

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